Emergent Optimisation

blackbeardblog:

To understand this post you need to look at this other post I just reblogged. So open that in a new tab.

That post is a nested reblog thread. One of the things people really hate about Tumblr is nested reblog threads – they are ugly and clunky and hard to read. What could possibly be good about them?

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Danah Boyd has made her latest book available as a free PDF

shihlun:

RIP: Stuart Hall (1932-2014)

The Stuart Hall Project (2013)

A John Akomfrah film about revolution, politics, culture and the New Left experience. With English Subtitles.

triciawang:

The Audience Has an Audience: Kevin Slavin & Kenyatta Cheese

This is the future of media.

(Future of StoryTelling 2013) (by Charles Melcher)

Photos, once slices of a moment in the past — sunsets, meetings with friends, the family vacation — are fast becoming an entirely new type of dialogue.

nprradiopictures:

To quickly explain [art collector Robert E. Jackson’s snapshot acquisition] method: He does most of his shopping on eBay — and the [snapshot] photos have often passed through many hands before reaching him. They’re often first discovered at estate sales, then sold at flea markets, then purchased and curated by eBay vendors — who then sell to collectors like Jackson.

In the process, a bin of family photos gets whittled down to, say, a series of people blowing out birthday candles. Suddenly, a theme emerges. A story. (Albeit one often unintended by the photographer.)

"It’s all about the mistakes," Jackson says, describing the things that catch his eye — like double-exposures, lens flares or people in the air. The quirky. The curious. The intimate.

Photography Phone Call: Are Snapshots Dead?


Video Credits
Photos from the collection of Robert E. Jackson
Produced by: Claire O’Neill

Chinese families’ worldly goods in Huang Qingjun’s pictures
Huang Qingjun has spent nearly a decade travelling to remote parts of China to persuade people who have sometimes never been photographed to carry outside all their household possessions and pose for him…

Chinese families’ worldly goods in Huang Qingjun’s pictures

Huang Qingjun has spent nearly a decade travelling to remote parts of China to persuade people who have sometimes never been photographed to carry outside all their household possessions and pose for him…

BBC